National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence
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The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of Middlesex County, Inc., as we know it today, has its roots in a solid history of education/prevention activities in the county starting back in the mid-1970s. At that time, an outreach movement began by the National Council on Alcoholism of Monmouth County, which resulted in the establishment of the NCA of Central Jersey, which included an office in Ocean County and one here in Middlesex.

Housed at Middlesex General Hospital, our county branch began operations without funds, but with a dedicated group of volunteers. The activities of the agency at this time included training events in school settings; seminars at Perth Amboy General, Middlesex General, and South Amboy Memorial Hospitals; programs for numerous community groups; in-service training for various county agencies; co-sponsorship of the first statewide conference on Alcohol Problems and the Criminal Justice System; and a countywide seminar on alcoholism for the clergy. Services continued until funding became scarce and in 1977, the Council was forced to close down its operation.

1979 was a rebirth of the community’s concern that alcoholism education/prevention services were needed in the county. An ad hoc committee was formed from among members of the South Brunswick Family Services Advisory Group and application was made to the New Jersey Alcoholism Association to establish the Middlesex Council on Alcoholism. Upon the signatures of Mr. Joseph Redmond, Dr. C.S. Whitaker, Jr., Ms. Leona Kaufman, Mr. H. Eugene Speckman, and Ms. Ruth Paul, the Council was incorporated in the spring of 1980.

Since 1980, NCADD of Middlesex County, Inc. has identified community needs and has met those needs with creativity and persistence. We have served hundreds of thousands of individuals through the wide array of programs we provide. NCADD is identified by the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services and the local prevention resource center. We are a leader in Middlesex County in providing quality prevention education programs and establishing coalitions to address specific needs in the community.

NCADD History Timeline

1980 Middlesex Council on Alcoholism is incorporated, providing an information/referral helpline and introduced Mr. Chugs, an alcohol prevention program for elementary school.
   
1983 Formed the Middlesex County Black Community Task Force and Hispanic Advisory Committee.
   
1985 Held first joint prom/graduation press conference with Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office. The success of this ongoing campaign is evident – there has not been one student fatality during prom/graduation season in Middlesex County since it began.
   
1986 Hosted first annual Legislative Reception, where more than 160 people attended. The reception also kicked off the 5th annual Alcohol Awareness Month.
   
1987 Agency is renamed Middlesex Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; at this time, drugs other than alcohol were incorporated into all programming.
   
1990 10th Anniversary was celebrated with a benefit concert at the State Theater in New Brunswick, featuring Roberta Flack.
 
1993 Agency name is changed to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) of Middlesex County, Inc.
   
1994 Partnered with the Governor’s Council for a Drug Free Workplace to provide services to the small and medium sized business
   
1996 Introduced two new programs: Forest Friends, a violence prevention program for elementary school; and WISE (Wellness Initiative for Senior Educators), to train older adults to develop and present prevention programs in the community.
   
1999 Implemented the We Check for 21 program, educating alcohol beverage vendors to prevent underage sale.
   
2000 Communities Against Tobacco (CAT) Coalition and REBEL (Reaching Everyone By Exposing Lies) were formed.
   
2000 Introduced We’re Not Buying It!, The Alcohol & Tobacco Connection to middle schools, teaching students about the methods used to market these products to young people.
   
2002 Celebrated National Recovery Month with first annual Tree of Hope, donated to Crawford House.
   
2002 www.ncadd-middlesex.com received award for outstanding electronic publication.
   
2003 Introduced Footprints for Life, a new prevention curriculum developed by NCADD of Middlesex County, Inc.
   
2003 Formed the Middlesex County Substance Abuse Coalition, the most comprehensive collaborative group addressing substance abuse in Middlesex County.
   
2004 Coalition hosted a very successful young women’s conference for high school girls.
   
2004 Resource Center was named the Jason Surks Memorial Prevention Resource Center at a dedication ceremony attended by ONCDP Deputy Director Scott Burns.
   
2005 Keys to InnerVisions (KIV) was introduced in five schools in the County.
   
2005 NCADD celebrates 25 years of Building Healthy Communities.
   
2006 Relocated office space to 152 Tices Lane, East Brunswick.
   
2006 Held 25th Anniversary Gala featuring Brenda Blackmon, news anchor at WWOR-TV as Master of Ceremonies and Judy Collins as Keynote Speaker.
   
2006 Launched Strengthening Families, whose goal is to prevent substance abuse in youth by helping them build skills and giving parents more tools to help their children become responsible young adults.
   
2006 Partnered with Carteret Public Schools to create PATHWAYS, Carteret’s School-Based Youth Services Program, a safe, structured environment within the school to address the social and health needs of students.
   
2007 Held regional Town Hall Meeting on prescription drug abuse, part of a national initiative.
   
2007 Launched an anti-gambling program targeting seniors and high school students.
   
2007 Footprints for Life was approved for the Service to Science program, an initiative that provides support to move the program closer to national recognition as an evidence-based program.
 

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